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VH Human Rights Prize 2018

January 15, 2018

IllustrationThe Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE), in partnership with the Vaclav Havel Library and the Charta 77 Foundation, has today issued a call for nominations for the 2018 Václav Havel Human Rights Prize.

The Prize, created in 2013, aims to reward outstanding civil society action in defending human rights in Europe and beyond. Candidates should have made a real difference to the human rights situation of a given group, been instrumental in uncovering large-scale systemic violations, or have successfully mobilised public opinion or the international community for a cause.

The Václav Havel Human Rights Prize, which will be awarded on 8 October 2018 in Strasbourg, consists of a sum of €60,000, a trophy and a diploma.

Since 2013, it was awarded successively to Ales Bialiatski (Belarus), Anar Mammadli (Azerbaijan), Ludmilla Alexeeva (Russian Federation), Nadia Murad (Iraq), and last year to Murat Arslan (Turkey), in detention, former Rapporteur of the Constitutional Court and President of the now dissolved Association for the Union of Judges and Prosecutors (YARSAV).

The deadline for submitting nominations is 30 April 2018. Nominations should be sent to the Parliamentary Assembly by e-mail to the following address: hrprize.pace@coe.int, using the form available on the Prize website. They should be signed by at least five sponsors and submitted in either English or French.

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Letters to Olga – essays written in prison, letter

„If I consider the problem as that which the world is turning me into – that is, as a tiny screw in a giant machine, deprived of human identity – then there is really nothing I can do. Obviously I cannot put a stop to the destruction of the globe, the growing stupidity of nations and the repoduction of thousands of new thermonuclear bombs. If, however, I consider it as that which each of us originally is, or rahter what each of us – irrespective of the state of the world – has the basic potential to become, which is to say an autonomous human being, capable of acting responsibly to and for the world, then of course there is a great deal I can do.“

Václav Havel:
Letters to Olga – essays written in prison, letter, March 6, 1982

Ivan Krastev: Europe's FutureVáclav Havel’s Prague