Portland

  • installation date: May 9, 2015
  • address: Lewis&Clark College, Portland, Oregon, USA
  • photo (c) Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic

Chairman Karel Schwarzenberg and Ambassador Gandalovič dedicated Václav Havel's Place on May 9, 2015, in commemoration of the former Czech President's extraordinary legacy.

Karel Schwarzenberg, Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the Czech Parliament and former Czech Minister of Foreign Affairs, and Barry Glassner, President of the Lewis & Clark College in Portland, unveiled a bench on the campus grounds marking the site.

Following Georgetown University and the City of Philadelphia, the Lewis & Clark College in Portland is the third place in the US to honor the legacy of Václav Havel, former President of the Czech Republic, playwright, philosopher and one of the most influential political and humanitarian thinkers of the 20th century. 

Ambassador of the Czech Republic to Washington, DC, Petr Gandalovič as well as students, professors and friends of the Czech Republic attended the dedication ceremony.  

The unveiling was followed by a theatre performance of scenes and excerpts from Václav Havel's dramatic and philosophical works, and a round table discussion about his legacy.

Speech to Joint Session of the United States Congress, Washington

„We are still a long way from that „family of man;“ in fact, we seem to be receding from the ideal rather than drawing closer to it. Interests of all kinds: personal, selfish, state, national, group and, if you like, company interests still considerably outweigh genuinely common and global interests. We are still under the sway of the destructive and thoroughly vain belief that man is the pinnacle of creation, and not just a part of it, and that therefore everything is permitted. There are still many who say they are concerdend not for themselves but for the cause, while they are demonstrably out for themselves and not for the cause at all. We are still destroying the planet that was entrusted to us, and its environment. We still close our eyes to the growing social, ethnic and cultural conflicts in the world. From time to time we say that the anonymous megamachinery we have created for ourselves no longer serves us but rather has enslaved us, yet we still fail to do anything about it.“

Václav Havel:
Speech to Joint Session of the United States Congress, Washington, February 21, 1990

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