Georgian Young Lawyers’ Association (Georgia)

Georgian Young Lawyers’ Association has been conducting human rights protection activities since 1994. Their activities are focused on the the following strategic fields:

Legal aid – Legal aid center of GYLA in Tbilisi and seven regions of Georgia provide legal assistance to tenth of thousands of citizens (consultation, preparation of legal documents and court representation in case of need). Special attention is paid to the facts, where human rights are violated by government, or administrative body. Vulnerable groups – GYLA pays special attention to protection of rights of religious, ethnic, sexual minorities, people with limited abilities, those, who live beyond the poverty line. Prisoners’ rights – GYLA is actively involved in monitoring of penitentiary systems. Special attention is paid to facts of torture and mistreatment. Participation in legal drafting – GYLA conducts constant monitoring of legislative process and prepares its own legal opinions on every draft, which is important for human rights. Raising awareness – There are many people in Georgia, who have no information about their rights – GYLA’s offices in the regions have been implementing campaigns for raising awareness throughout Georgia (trainings, seminars and field meetings to ensure awareness of local groups and support democratic involvement of them in the country’s political and social life). Strategic litigation – first, denunciation of discriminative legal acts, or acts, which violate human rights through trial at constitutional court of Georgia, and the second, representation of Georgian citizens at European Court of Human Rights. Protection of Media Interests – on the base of GYLA has been established Media Legal Defense Center, which ensures protection of rights and interests of different media sources and journalists.

Speech on receiving the Indira Gandhi Prize, New Delhi

„Many Europeans and Americans today are painfully aware of the fact that Euro-American civilization has undermined and destroyed the autonomy of non-European cultures. They feel it was their fault, and thus feel they have to make amends through a kind of emotional identification with others, through accommodating them, through trying to ingratiate themselves, through a longing to “help” them in one way or another. To my mind, this is a false way of going about it… It contains… the same familiar feeling of superiority… It is inverted colonialism. It is an intellectual spasm. I think we will all help one another best if we make no pretences, remain ourselves, and simply respect and honour one another, just as we are. “

Václav Havel:
Speech on receiving the Indira Gandhi Prize, New Delhi, February 8, 1994

Havel—Prigov and czech experimental poetry